Insufficient but not Unnecessary: The Importance of Arguments

Andy Naselli has posted a great quote by American theologian and founder of Westminster Theological Seminary, J. Gresham Machen, on the place of arguments in the proclamation of the Gospel:

“Certainly a Christianity that avoids argument is not the Christianity of the New Testament. The New Testament is full of argument in defense of the faith. The Epistles of Paul are full of argument—no one can doubt that. But even the words of Jesus are full of argument in defense of the truth of what Jesus was saying. “If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask Him?” Is not that a well-known form of reasoning, which the logicians would put in its proper category? Many of the parables of Jesus are argumentative in character. Even our Lord, who spake in the plenitude of divine authority, did condescend to reason with men. Everywhere the New Testament meets objections fairly, and presents the gospel as a thoroughly reasonable thing.

Some years ago I was in a company of students who were discussing methods of Christian work. An older man, who had had much experience in working among students, arose and said that according to his experience you never win a man to Christ until you stop arguing with him. When he said that, I was not impressed.

It is perfectly true, of course, that argument alone is quite insufficient to make a man a Christian. You may argue with him from now until the end of the world: you may bring forth the most magnificent arguments: but all will be in vain unless there be one other thing—the mysterious, creative power of the Holy Spirit in the new birth. But because argument is insufficient, it does not follow that it is unnecessary. Sometimes it is used directly by the Holy Spirit to bring a man to Christ. But more frequently it is used indirectly. A man hears an answer to objections raised against the truth of the Christian religion: and at the time when he hears it he is not impressed. But afterwards, perhaps many years afterwards, his heart at last is touched: he is convicted of sin; he desires to be saved. Yet without that half-forgotten argument he could not believe: the gospel would not seem to him to be true, and he would remain in his sin. As it is, however, the thought of what he has heard long ago comes into his mind; Christian apologetics at last has its day, the way is open, and when he will believe he can believe because he has been made to see that believing is not an offence against truth.”

from “The Importance of Christian Scholarship” (pdf file at reformedaudio.org).

(HT: Joe Fleener)

1 reply
  1. Stuart Leeds
    Stuart Leeds says:

    I totally agree with this post. I have been helping with a Christianity Explored course in London these last weeks. It uses the Gospel of Mark and the arguements contained within that Gospel to present to folk the truths of Christianity; who is Jesus, what was his purpose, how should we respond.

    People do react in different ways, but the arguements are so important for a person to come to know what Christianity is about. Often you can see the discomfort in their reaction as the implications of what Christianity proposes as truth becomes clearer in their minds.

    All we can do is provide the evidence by clear arguement and presentation. The rest is Gods work through the Holy Spirit.

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