John Wesley’s 308th Birthday

Jayson Bradley, writing for Logostalk, the Logos Bible Software Blog reminds us that on this past Friday, June 17th was the birthday of John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist church. He would have been 308. He writes;

Like any looming figure in Christian history, Wesley has his share of both theological supporters and detractors. But there are very few that will question the fervency and urgency Wesley felt when it came to evangelism and church work. As Prime Minister, Lord Baldwin, said of Wesley, “I am supposed to be a busy man, but by the side of Wesley, I join the ranks of the unemployed.”

To celebrate Wesley’s birthday, he shares five little known facts about his life. In his words,

  1. John Wesley came from a huge family.
    The child mortality rate in eighteenth century England was unbelievably high. Statistics suggest that 70% of all deaths were children under ten. So it is not surprising that many families had an abundance of children. John Wesley’s mother—Susanna Wesley—was the 25th of 25 children and she went on to bear a number of children as well. John was the 15th of 19 children. Susanna lost nine of her children in infancy. When Susanna died in 1742, she was only survived by eight of her children.
  2. John Wesley was a victim of bullying as a child.
    John, a short and intelligent boy, was bullied relentlessly as a child. This abuse affected him for the rest of his life. Accounts tell of how, as an adult, Wesley would tremble when discussing the barbaric treatment he received from his peers.
  3. John Wesley vehemently opposed slavery.
    Wesley was inspired to join the anti-slavery movement when he read a pamphlet by Quaker abolitionist Anthony Benezet. He was so moved that he frequently preached against the slave trade and authored Thoughts upon Slavery—a pamphlet publicly decrying the practice. Wesley’s last letter was written to convert and fellow abolitionist William Wilberforce. In it he wrote:

    “O be not weary of well doing! Go on, in the name of God and in the power of his might, till even American slavery (the vilest that ever saw the sun) shall vanish away before it.”

    This letter was written in 1791, and sixteen years later Parliament finally outlawed England’s participation in the slave trade.

  4. John Wesley is one of history’s most traveled men.
  5. Biographer Edward T. Oakes states that Wesley traveled over 250,000 miles by horseback in his lifetime—that’s ten times the circumference of the earth.

  6. John Wesley is credited for coining the phrase “agree to disagree.”
  7. Wesley often found himself at odds with George Whitefield. Whitefield, who shared Wesley’s enthusiasm for evangelism, clashed openly with Wesley on issues of soteriology. Eventually, the rivalry between Wesley and Whitefield’s theologies introduced an impassioned partisanship among their followers.

    In a memorial sermon delivered after Whitefield’s passing, Wesley minimized the schism saying:

    There are many doctrines of a less essential nature . . . In these we may think and let think; we may agree to disagree. But, meantime, let us hold fast the essentials . . .

    This sermon is widely recognized as the first time “agree to disagree” appeared in print.

If you are looking for more great discussion about John Wesley, check out Ten Thought-Provoking John Wesley Quotes by Robert Campbell .

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