Posts

Can God be both outside time and in time?

Paul Helm explores Rob Lister’s claim in God is Impassible and Impassioned that God exists in two modes.

Paul Helm on Philosophical Theology

Credo Magazine has a helpful interview with Paul Helm on the nature of philosophical theology and its purpose in the life of the church.

Here’s an excerpt:

[pk_box width=”600″ align=”center”]“Is Philosophical Theology important for the church today? Why?”

“It’s important that those who have responsibilities in the church should reflect on what they say, link it to the great Christian tradition of the relationship between church and culture. Otherwise we make mistakes, we unintentionally might talk nonsense. (‘At the Cross, God died’; ‘I prayed so hard, and God changed his mind’.) We need to know what our message means, and also what it does not mean. This requires continuous Bible study and theological reflection, but we also need to reflect on our theology. Theology is not just a game, but a serious business. For all these tasks some understanding of philosophical theology can help.”[/pk_box]

Read the whole thing here.

Source: Paul Manata and Patrick Chan

Faith in the Face of Evil

Paul Helm:

Faith cannot be totally blind, a gamble in the face of infinite odds. Whatever doubts and risks may be associated with trust, faith, in order for it to be intelligible and defensible, must have some evidence going for it. And the point of Christianity (at least) is to hold that enough of the purposes of God can be seen to trust him for what cannot be seen.

We may trust God in the face of evil not by an act of blind faith, but because there are other parts of the ways of God that are eminently trustworthy. God has a plan; parts of that plan are intelligible to us, and we trust him for what at present it is hard to make sense of.

One reason why it is hard to make sense of the plan of God is that it expresses itself in a temporally unfolding panorama which we, living for a few years in the 20th century, can only see part of.

The faith which can face and even surmount evil cannot be a mindless leap; nor is it a form of faith which has all the answers. It sees part of the picture, and trusts the Creator and Redeemer for what it cannot see.

Read the rest here.

[HT: Patrick Chan]