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Albert Mohler and Jim Wallis Debate Social Justice and the Mission of the Church

On October 27, Albert Mohler and Jim Wallis debated the question “Is Social Justice an Essential Part of the Mission of the Church?”. If you missed the live webcast, the Henry Center has posted the media from the event:

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In the exchange, Wallis, president and CEO of Sojourners, argued for the affirmative position – the church must be involved in social justice issues – and Mohler, president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, argued the negative – while granting social justice as a good and important activity for Christians, he contended that social justice is not the gospel. The exchange highlighted many issues under discussion in evangelicalism today – the nature of the gospel, its definition, breadth, and implications – and while the theological approaches of both participants meant they were frequently talking past each other, it is still worth listening to.

For an excellent review of the debate, check out Matthew Lee Anderson’s assessment here.

The Gospel Paradox

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[pk_image image=”” title=”” w=”60″ image_style=”square” h=”0″ align=”left” icon=”” action=”” link=”” link_target=”_self” lightbox_gallery_id=””]”We do not need to bear our guilt, nor do we even have to merit the merit of Christ. He does it all. So in one way it is the easiest religion in the world. But now we can turn that over because it is the hardest religion in the world for the same reason. The heart of the rebellion of Satan and man was the desire to be autonomous; and accepting the Christian faith robs us not of our existence, not of our worth (it give us our worth), but it robs us completely of being autonomous. We did not make ourselves, we are not a product of chance, we are none of these things; we stand there before a Creator plus nothing, we stand before the Savior plus nothing — it is a complete denial of being autonomous. Whether it is conscious or unconscious (and in them most brilliant people it is occasionally conscious), when they see the sufficiency of the answers on their own level, they suddenly are up against their innermost humanness — not humanness as they were created to be human but human in the bad sense since the Fall. That is the reason that people do not accept the sufficient answers and why they are counted by God as disobedient and guilty when they do not bow.”
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Francis Schaeffer, The God Who Is There (InterVarsity Press, 1968).